Deeper Learning with WeVideo at ISTE19 (Ep 9)

March 07, 2022/ By
Deeper Learning with WeVideo at ISTE19 (Ep 9)

This episode features the full event recording from "Deeper Learning with WeVideo" at ISTE 2019 in Philadelphia. This was a special event with keynote speaker Dee Lanier from EdTechTeam, Krishna Menon, the CEO of WeVideo, and Dr. Nathan Lang-Raad, the Chief Education Officer of WeVideo. Enjoy the full presentation and be sure to share with your fellow educators!

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Transcript

Dr. Nathan Lang-Raad:

Hey everyone. Welcome to the Deeper Learning With WeVideo Podcast. I am Dr. Nathan Lang-Raad and this is episode number nine. In this episode, I want to share with you the Deeper Learning With We video event recording from SD 2019 in Philadelphia. This was a special event with key note speaker Dee Lanier from Ed Tech Team, [inaudible 00:00:25] the CEO of WeVideo, and myself as the chief education officer of WeVideo. Enjoy the full presentation and be sure to share with your fellow educators. All right, enjoy.

Scott Devore:

Good afternoon everybody.

audience:

Good afternoon.

Scott Devore:

Excellent. Let me be the first one to welcome you to SD in Philadelphia 2019. So my name is Scott [Devour 00:00:57]. I'm the territory sales manager for WeVideo for the northeast. We may have corresponded in email. We might have talked on the phone. We might have even done a Google Hangout once or twice. But if we haven't met, let's make sure before you leave, we do connect. We know that you come a long way and we're really excited that you guys could come and be a part of the Deeper Learning With WeVideo. Before we get started, we've got a short video to get started with.

Speaker 4:

My name is [inaudible 00:01:34]. I am an educational technology specialist and I've been working in education for the last 11 years. There's a few features about WeVideo that helped us decided. One of those features is the connectivity to Google everything. The fact that it connects to Google Drive and our students can navigate Google Drive rather easily, anything that they save goes right to their Google Drive really was the catalyst for us to be our choice.

Edward Gonzales:

My name is Edward Gonzales and I'm a math intervention specialist at Emerson Middle School. The reason I like using WeVideo on Chromebooks in the classroom is that it gives kids access in a way that I hadn't seen. Before you would have to work on a desktop computer that had specific software, or you would have to work only in a certain class. The Chromebook is where it really just revolutionizes the process because now I don't have to share my laptop with the kid. Everybody has access, so it's a big deal. It's access. It's all about access.

Speaker 4:

The changes I've seen in students since they've started using WeVideo is an excitement when they're producing and creating something that demonstrates what they know. Those kids all of a sudden get in front of a video editing platform and they're the star. They're the one guiding everybody and they really flourish. So getting to see the kids be the leaders to teach others and to just succeed and flourish is the most exciting thing. It's giving them a chance to win.

Scott Devore:

So this next gentleman I'm going to bring up, I'm really excited to bring up here to share with you. He is a socialist turn technologist. No, no.

Dee Lanier:

Sociologist.

Scott Devore:

Sociologist. It's been a long day. I apologize. Wow. Wow. With that being said, let me introduce Dee Lanier from the Ed Tech team.

audience:

Our favorite socialist.

Dee Lanier:

Oh god. Please don't tweet that out. That was beautiful though. I wouldn't have it any other way. So yes, my name is Dee Lanier and I am a director with Ed Tech team, work with the Dynamic Learning Project. Would love for you to check out dynamiclearningproject.com, find out more about that. But less about me and more about you, because I'm very glad to be in your midst you guys. I recognize that I'm in a room full of artists. Who are all my artists out here? Let me see your hands. Okay, okay, artist, artist. You guys, do you draw? You paint? You dance? You sing? You play instruments? Excellent. [inaudible 00:04:22] making it up in the kitchen. Pretty nice. Wait, every hand in here should've gone up. Who are my educators? You design experiences for students and teachers, for your whole community. You are artists. Next time I ask, raise your hand high. I am honored to be in your midst. Thank you fellow artists and socialists.

Dee Lanier:

So if you did see the title of this talk and it's called Design Teaching, maybe you were thinking he's going to teach us design and we have our laptops out, and we're ready, and we're ready to sketch note. You can do all of those things, but I'm not going to teach you any of those things, because some of those things I don't know how to do. I'm hoping that you recognize the correlation between design thinking and teaching. So what is design teaching? First of all, it's looking at all the problems that exist and saying, "We're going to fix that and we're going to fix it systematically if we have to." Because problems exist in our classroom. Anybody else? So I had you brag on yourselves. You're all artists. Are you chaotic artists? Meaning when it comes to classroom management you're like, "Okay, guys. Please. Guys, please." Me too. I'm with you, I'm with you. All right. Design thinking, I know you're familiar. I love me some design thinking and we're consider how can we design think our classrooms. That's what we're doing.

Dee Lanier:

So backing it up real quick because you're like, oh these kids were cute. Whose kids are those? Those are my kids. We think of empathize, define, ideate, prototype, test. It's a lot to remember in order and all that. The way I remember it is every day is party time. Every day is party time. Now you won't forget it because that's what my twins think. Every day at 6AM is party time. Go back to bed. Go into a quiet space. Read a book. Do something, just stop making noise. I would like to sleep today, but every day is party time to them and they are adorable. Right? Look at them. They're eight now, but there's the rest of the fam. This is also where I get sympathy because you're like, how many kids he got? This is Ellis and her brother [Sylis 00:06:40] and they are eight. This is [Landis 00:06:42]. This is the wild card y'all and she is nine. Gosh, follow my wife Stacey and you'll see videos of her. She's nuts. This is [Kariss 00:06:52] and she's 12. You see how tall she is? I know I'm in trouble. This is my wife Stacey and she is tired.

Dee Lanier:

She's like, "Come home. Come home now. You're where? You're having fun. Don't show me anymore pictures of cheese steaks. I don't care. You left me here with these kids." All right. So a little bit more get to you. Real quick, so this was my childhood. Anybody else? I know I got some geeks in the room. Bonus points, who knows what this is? Close. classroom. classroom, this was my first drone. It was awesome. It was amazing. I actually traded this for the classroom. My mom was all mad. I'm like, but it was kind of cool, but I like to play video games. Where my people at? My people. Commodore 64. Plug that bad boy into a television, ready to go. Oh the dark ages. Here's the question. If I had candy to pass out, I would pass out for this one. How much storage is on this? Uh oh. Go ahead. The answer is not socialist.

audience:

[inaudible 00:08:02]. 1.2 megabytes.

Dee Lanier:

We've got some clear nos. Anybody no definitively? No one is Google searching, which is amazing.

audience:

1.44.

Dee Lanier:

That's the upgrade.

audience:

[inaudible 00:08:18].

Dee Lanier:

Five 12K. I wish I had candy sir. Boost for the win, which is crazy because if you consider the last four pictures I just showed you would not fit on that disk. That's crazy. That was my childhood and this is my adult childhood. You guys, I'm not kidding when I say I think I'm Tony Stark. I walk into my house, I have a projector. I have 27 different bulbs connected. It's stupid. It's really ridiculous, but I do the basics as well as the crazy extravagant. I say to Google stuff like, "Hey, I would like for you to add this event to my calendar." It says, "Okay D. I got you. I'll do that." I'm like, "Cool. I don't even have to think about it." But every now and then, it fails. True story. That was a double fail. Wait for it. Somebody caught that. So can I get a witness? Tech in the classroom sometimes can be very disruptive. You guys agree with me? I know you guys agree with me. It's a pain in the butt, isn't it? How disruptive tech can be. Intercoms, kidding me? Most disruptive tech that has existed in the classroom for years.

Dee Lanier:

I know a person who happens to have a switch to cut it off in her room. I'm like, I need to know your tech person. All right. Before this started, you got to see a very well produced video. What I'm going to show you next is a very non well produced video. Not only is it really bad quality, sorry [inaudible 00:09:57] But what you're going to witness is some serious problems. I want you to design think some of the problems from my first couple years teaching, if it plays.

Dee Lanier:

Can you read that word?

audience:

Bone.

Dee Lanier:

What's the next word?

audience:

[inaudible 00:10:19].

Dee Lanier:

Is that being difficult?

audience:

[inaudible 00:10:23].

Dee Lanier:

What word did you have down? What word is that?

audience:

I don't know. [inaudible 00:10:25]

Dee Lanier:

Facsimile. Anybody know what a Facsimile machine is?

audience:

It's some type of computer.

Dee Lanier:

Anybody heard of a fax machine?

audience:

Yeah.

Dee Lanier:

That's all Facsimile is. Fax is short for Facsimile. So when you read that word, everybody knows what it is, right?

audience:

A fax machine.

Dee Lanier:

A fax machine. So the world has been made smaller through technology, through such things as computers and? But I had a word wall y'all. Fax machines and telephones. Word wall.

audience:

[inaudible 00:10:59].

Dee Lanier:

I had my rules clearly posted, except for that one fell down. I'd ask you the question like, what was wrong there? But I really don't want you to hurt my feelings that bad. Just leave it alone. We all know who was talking to the most, who was standing at the front and who was sleeping. Oh gosh. There's so much I could say about this, but I'm going to move it on. Here's the deal. I believe that good design achieves its intended outcome. Based on the design of that classroom, I was getting exactly what should've been expected, but I wasn't getting what I wanted. So I recognized my kids don't care. They give a crap about this curriculum. Really the way that I'm doing it is clearly not working, so something has to change. So that became my mission. How can I change it so that I'm no longer sitting in my car crying after work, figuring out how am I going to get through to these kids? Because I signed up for this vocation of education in order to make a difference. When you got kids sleeping in class, I know that's not happening.

Dee Lanier:

So decided, let's do some things different. I had to stop. I had to stop what I was ... can I just say it? Trained to do. My first-aid kit and where I got the great idea to have the word wall and the clearly posted rules, and when I would stand outside my classroom and look my kids in the eye, and put my hand out and say, "Hi, I'm Mr. Lanier." The kids would just walk by me and be like, "Get out of my face." I'm like, what in the world? Our hero. What do you do when your first-aid doesn't work? Got to go somewhere else. I started noticing some of the things. So I would have standards, objectives and essential questions written on the board. The kids were expected to come in quietly, take out a piece of paper and to write those things down. If this is your classroom experience, please don't raise your hand because we all know this is what we're going to do. I was putting them to sleep as soon as we started.

Dee Lanier:

I realized somethings got to change. So I just stopped doing that. I'll tell you a little bit more as to why I think it makes sense to change some of that. Just think about it. I'm a big movie fan and who goes to the movie to see this first? Even if a Marvel film, you're not going to go see that first. That's like what we do when we put those things on the board. Check this out. I took a picture at one of the schools and what I supported, the Dynamic Learning Project. I was like, oh this is perfect, because this is what I used to do too because it was expected of me in order to have my state standards posted for who?

audience:

[inaudible 00:13:46].

Dee Lanier:

You said it, I didn't. All right. Get in trouble if you want to. This is an art class. Who's excited for art after reading that? I can't wait to do that. What if this is the first thing you have to write when you come in? If you're in fourth grade, are you kidding me? No joke. That was posted outside of this classroom in Pittsburgh. Poor design in my opinion. I took that same thing and I put it through a readability score. Are you kidding me? Who was it written for? Truly, clearly, easily, recognizable not for the kids. They were doing this that day. See the disconnect? All right. So why is this important? Let me ask you this. What's your favorite movie.

audience:

Godfather.

Dee Lanier:

Godfather, oh. I'd ask you why, but I'm scared. We're good. We're good. Very good to meet you Rowland. All right. So just think about whatever your favorite movie is. You guys can probably tell I'm a superhero fan. I sport superhero shirts on the regular. This was my normal attire in the classroom. This was my favorite movie of all time. Crazy. The reason is, is because it's so much more than a superhero film. Because if I can tell you that as a man of color to recognize that I've always been a fan of superheros like Luke Cage or now there's Black Lightning, but these are heroes of the hood. I thought what I needed being from the hood, and what I thought that my kids would be inspired by if I had the opportunity to rewind and play it back, would be heroes from the hood. But to recognize, no. There's a hero that's bigger than that. Let you know, I went to go see Black Panther. I actually didn't see Black Panther on opening night. I say Pantera Negra.

Dee Lanier:

I was in Costa Rica and I was at an event. I was like, I got to go see it. It's opening night. I'm looking at all of these pictures on Instagram and people, and seeing black outs at theaters, and some people know what I'm talking about. Wearing dashikis and doing Wakanda Forever. I'm like, I'm there. I got to see this movie you guys. I go to the movie and I'm the only person of color there. Actually, that's incorrect. I'm in Costa Rica. I'm the only black person there. After the movie not only did they kill the whole thing, as soon as the movie goes off, lights go on and I'm like, what are you doing? Do you not know this is a Marvel film? You don't do this. People are leaving. I'm also just in awe and I'm struck, and I'm holding the sides of my seat because I just experienced something and it is jarring to me. I can recognize that no one around understands. My wife puts her arm on my shoulder and I just lose it because this movie meant so much more to me. Because this wasn't a hero of the hood. This was King T'Challa from Wakanda.

Dee Lanier:

My imagination was somewhere else. Those lights came on and it was disturbing to me. So here I am in this packed out, yet lonely movie theater, with the lights on, with tears streaming down my eyes, feeling embarrassed and frustrated. I believe that Ryan Coogler who designed that film as a director, intended for me to feel a certain way afterwards. I thought, why can't I bring that experience in education? Because there are artists that understand these things and they do it on purpose. Great quote. It is literally neuro ... I can't say that word. Neuro biologically impossible to think deeply about things that you don't care about. Consider that. Consider that. We think, kids you have to know this information. Why? Because it's on the test. Does that work? Scientifically even, it doesn't work. It can't. Research, we look at it. So we're at a WeVideo event. We're at a ISTE event. Computer science and engineering is highlighted here and look what's also clumped here at the top; art and design, performing arts.

Dee Lanier:

We know that these are the things that the kids love. Look what's on the bottom. Sorry math teachers, but you already knew it. Here's my question. When a school is "failing" what are the first things we take away?

audience:

Arts [inaudible 00:19:08].

Dee Lanier:

We want them to do well on the test. Okay. You guys see the problem? It's a problem that needs to be solved, so we got to design think this. I just thought about my own childhood. Here's a picture of me. Yes, that's me. It's not just a kid with an Instagram filter and got some clothes at Old Navy. That's me in the '80s in San Diego. I don't know what I was looking at, buy I looked through my Google photos and I'm like, [inaudible 00:19:36]. It's everywhere. It's like, wow. Memories. I can tell you about every single one of those pictures. I can tell you about every single one of those pictures and what I was experience. I realized, you know what? We got to teach kids to care. If we can teach kids to care and it's not teaching them the curriculum and telling them they got to care about it, we got to teach them to care. I think the number one way that we can teach them to care is for us to care. For us to care about them, to care about where they come from, what their stories are, and ask them can they share more.

Dee Lanier:

I think that's what our goal is as educators. So how? Hopefully I've inspired you just a little bit. Here are just a couple of things that I believe that we can do as educators, bring about this change in our classrooms. First of all, let's start here. Look around here. How is this room designed? What do you expect? You expect to listen to a talking head. But if we just change, just a little bit, we have a different design with a different intention. This next little quick thing, it has some audio to it because I wish you could not only see this room and hear this room, but also smell the essential oils that were being diffused in this classroom. I walked in the classroom and I was like, whoa. Do you think that this teacher has classroom rules? It's chill. I think that she created an environment where people can quietly listen and learn.

Dee Lanier:

This was my classroom, my last classroom that I taught in two years ago. This was first day of school. I brought everybody in. I said, "Huddle in guys. Huddle in." Everybody is standing and I said, "Look around. What do you want to see happen here?" We designed that classroom together and we re designed it sometimes based on whatever we were going to experience differently that day. This was me getting better at teaching, but not better at videography.

Dee Lanier:

Y'all focused? This isn't even mine.

audience:

[inaudible 00:22:08].

Dee Lanier:

You don't even have to put them together yet. You'll re gather tomorrow and put them together.

audience:

Look, man. [inaudible 00:22:16].

Dee Lanier:

You don't have any more questions for him? Everybody is done?

audience:

[inaudible 00:22:22].

Dee Lanier:

What about that one? Is she done?

audience:

Who?

Dee Lanier:

[inaudible 00:22:25] are you done? Are you done with your questions? Hey, here's my suggestion. Ask Ms. Adams which questions she has left and you can take one or two of hers. Because you compile them tomorrow. How's it coming y'all?

audience:

Good. Hello.

Dee Lanier:

Y'all working hard?

audience:

[inaudible 00:22:50].

Dee Lanier:

[inaudible 00:22:54]. We got about four more minutes. Good job you guys. Working hard, keep working together. All right. So things were starting to get a little bit better. This is just a couple years later in that same setting. I'm sorry, in the same setting you saw earlier. We don't have time for me, but you're going to have to believe me. That happened for another 10 minutes, complete silence because we designed it that way. We had limited devices. It was the beginning of the year and all the Chromebooks weren't deployed and all that. It was like, okay. How do we use these limitations to our advantage and let's design an experience? How do we do it so that the kids aren't fighting and arguing over all of the limited devices we had? Well, we just made a game out of it. You can see they were doing silent research on passion projects and there was a 10 minute timer. It worked.

Dee Lanier:

Doing things like, this is one thing I love. That's an SOS card. If you've seen posters, shout out digital management, [inaudible 00:24:03]. The whole idea of ask three before me, I game-ified it. Have a card, say "Any of you guys, if you have a problem, ask me if you need to. But remember, you have these other resources. But if you need me, raise the card and I'll come and help you. And I'll take the card, so use it wisely." So crazy how that works. I don't know about you, but now that we're in this era of teaching the soft skills and I have the question like, how do you teach something like grit? How do you teach grit? How I taught it, it was a big fat fail the first time. So I came to my advisory group of kids. I said, "Hey, let's grab some stuff from the pantry," because I like to get into maker spaces and stuff. The art teachers loved me because I was always raiding their shelves. I was like, "Hey, let me get some of this stuff and let's get some Popsicle sticks." I have these 15 boys and we're going to teach grit today.

Dee Lanier:

I'm like, "Boys, this is how we're going to do this. I'm going to give you some Popsicle sticks. I'm going to give you access to YouTube. You're going to look up some videos. Here's something that's really, really cool. It's called exploding Popsicle sticks. Check it out." I thought it was going to be awesome. The kids just started getting really mad, really frustrated. There's one kid in particular, his name is [Jamad 00:25:22]. He would tell me up front, "Mr. Lanier, you need to understand I get angry easy." Then I had another kid Levi and his mom said, "What you need to understand is that he gets embarrassed easily. If he gets embarrassed, he runs." I said, "Okay." All right, so then we do this. I give them all Popsicle sticks, things start going well at first and then it starts to not go so well. Then Levi picks up the Popsicle sticks and I saw it like slow motion. Picks up these Popsicle sticks and here's Jamad on the other end.

Dee Lanier:

I'm like, no. Don't do it. It was like slow mo right into his face. I'm like, uh oh. Jamad is about to go off. Jamad is about to haul off on this kid. But before he could, Levi is gone. You guys ever deal with a runner? It was like, APB, we got a kid. He's a runner. It was crazy. So that was a fail. Then we came back and said we're going to try it again. Eventually, this is Jamad before school. I think we eventually taught grit because design thinking says if it fails, let's figure out what the problem is and lest figure it out. I just decided to start setting some new goals. So my standard was to start designing experiences instead of teaching lessons. My objective was to start making students curious, instead of giving them the answers and telling them that it's important, and that they needed to copy this because it was for the test. Instead, making them curious to want to know the answers and to discover those answers for themselves. Then this was my essential question. The essential question for myself is, what relevant real world problem can be solved after the kids learn this content?

Dee Lanier:

So telling them about a Facsimile machine is completely irrelevant to them. It just started making me think. How can we infuse art and design in everything we teach? Oh, wait a minute. We've actually done this before. We just take it away whenever our test scores get low. Where's shop class? This one is going to blow your mind if you have not seen this before. (silence).

Dee Lanier:

What? I actually think I would enjoy science. I'm sorry, you're a science teacher.

audience:

[inaudible 00:28:44].

Dee Lanier:

All right. I'm sorry. I'm just saying. I'm just saying I think that if I was taught history a different way than just memorizing facts and put it on a timeline, I actually would've probably loved it. My kids know every single word, but we make it our job to bore kids to death and I don't understand. It's like, what if we were just to tell them, "Hey, you like music? Cool. Make a song with this content." You don't have to be the ones doing it. As we wrap up, I think that what we need to do, the how in all of this is to consider that ... All right. Let me say it this way. If you're going to memorize anything, memorize this. That assigners create the conditions for critique, but designers create the conditions for creativity. So be a designer.

Dee Lanier:

One of the things that I had the privilege of helping design, Smashboard EDU. The reason why I say I got to help design, because all it is, is creating the conditions for kids to solve real world problems and then to showcase their solutions using tools like the WeVideo or others. My name is Dee Lanier. I design teaching and learning experiences for kids and adults. What do you do?

audience:

Ms. Snyder, please call the main office.

Dee Lanier:

That's it. Thank you.

Bethany Gonzales:

My name is Bethany Gonzales and I teach and I teach third grade. I love using WeVideo ...

Dee Lanier:

[crosstalk 00:30:31].

Bethany Gonzales:

In the classroom because of the self expression and the creativity that it really allows students. The things that they produce are so amazing.

Ms. Tolls:

My name is Ms. [Tolls 00:30:40]. I teach eight grade. Project based learning and collaboration in my classroom using WeVideo looks great because you have all the students working together on a project. For example, I had the students do a women's history essay with the information they gathered. They came into a group to collaborate and now they're going to turn it into an informational video about women's history.

Bethany Gonzales:

WeVideo is very simple, so you don't have to know much to be able to do it. We retain a lot more of the information because if you're writing a project or a paper, you get bored really easily. But when you're having fun, you actually retain more information and learn better.

Ms. Tolls:

They're creating, they're thinking, they're writing, they're speaking, they're listening. They're doing everything that we want them to do in school, but it's in a fun way.

Scott Devore:

Let's give another hand for Dee. It's my pleasure to bring up the CEO of WeVideo, Krishna Menon.

Krishna Menon:

Thanks again Dee. That's going to be a tough act to follow. One second here. First, I'd like to thank you all for making it to this event. I speak for the whole WeVideo team, it truly is a pleasure for us, for you all to attend this event today. WeVideo has been around now since 2011 and in that 2011, we've had a lot of traction. Over 10 million students have used WeVideo in the classroom. I thought I would spend a little bit of time today talking about what we've learned through that journey in terms of video creation in the classroom. Then I'm going to end the talk by showing you something that we're going to announce, which is more looking ahead as to what we're working on.

Krishna Menon:

First, let's start with some data. About a couple years ago, we did a fairly detailed survey of educators. What we were trying to figure out was, what's the importance of video in the classroom? Especially video creation. Then eventually, how does WeVideo play into their curriculum? What we found was that two thirds of educators believe that video stimulates discussion and increases student motivation. This is just pure use of video in the classroom. Then you look in terms of video creation. 85% believe that video creation is a critical skill going on. Then when you look at WeVideo itself, you can see that there's a [inaudible 00:33:22] percent approval of WeVideo, using WeVideo in the classroom for video creation. So clearly, the use of video in the classroom is important and increasing.

Krishna Menon:

I don't know if all of you are familiar with WeVideo, so I thought I'll talk a little bit about what it is. At the heart of it, it's a video creation platform intended for K12, to meet the teaching and learning goals in the classroom. What does that mean? Of course, at the heart of it, it is a video editor. But there's a bunch of other features that make it critical in the classroom environment. We take our privacy very seriously, especially student privacy. So it's completely built to be [inaudible 00:33:59] compliant. It's web based and cloud based, so all you need is a browser to get started. It completely takes over any dependence in hardware. As I mentioned, the two key features from a student perspective are both creativity and collaboration in the classroom. You can have students collaborating with each other or teachers collaborating with each other. Students and teachers also.

Krishna Menon:

We learned early on that this could be used in any grade level, which means you've got people with different skillsets using it. So we had to create something that had adaptive user experience, to make sure that when a first grader uses it, they don't find it intimidating. On the other hand, if an eighth grader is using it, there's enough functionality for them to do their projects. Then the administration part of it. When you get to larger districts with 20, 30,000 students, it has to be easy for the IT administrators to manage it. That's where we've got integrations with student information systems and all that, so we don't have to worry about when a student leaves the system, that they have to go in and manually delete it. We automatically do it for you. It's all developed for the classroom itself.

Krishna Menon:

In terms of 21st Century skills, educators now have collaborative projects to acquire what we call the four C's, which is creativity, collaboration, communication and critical thinking. These collaboration projects again, it could be teachers initiating it or students working with each other. Of course, teachers providing feedback to students on their work itself. In terms of adoption as you can see, for a long time we actually weren't ... Most of our growth has been organic. It's basically teachers using it and then telling other teachers about it. It wasn't like we were out there doing marketing. Thanks to you all, that's how we had our growth. In that seven or eight year stride, we've had 10 million plus students using it in over 8,000 schools right now. Clearly, we've had a lot of adoption in the classroom and we continue to grow on a yearly basis.

Krishna Menon:

These are some things that educators are talking about. First and foremost, they like the fact that we're providing this medium for students to display the learning. Most students these days are not only digitally native, but they're also video native because that's in their every day life. The other part they like a lot, as you heard in the video, is that it's easy to use. Again, doesn't matter if you're a first grader or eighth grader, the platform is deep and it's also easy to adapt depending ... you can adapt the user experience based on what the skill level of the user is. First, we have a lot of data that we collect and we found was that, when you look at schools itself, it's equally used whether it's primary, middle or high school. So it's not just used in primary school or in high schools. It's used across the different grades. Then if you look at the different subjects, again, it's English language arts, history, math, everything is covered. So it's not just a question of acquiring video skills. It's using video as a way of learning in the classroom.

Krishna Menon:

Again, so this is the data that shows how it's used in different classrooms and different curriculum. By the way, at the end of this meeting here, we'll have the presentation available for everybody else if you want to see what the data is. If you're trying to see what the functionality is, again, there's many different ways of using WeVideo in the classroom. You can do a podcast. Again, it's a very popular activity or you can do green screens project based learning. We've actually provided over a million plus items of content as part of ... that's curated especially for the classroom. So it's all been cleaned up and made sure that it's student appropriate. Again, so it just shows that it's a very flexible platform that allows and supports many different workflows in the classroom. Here's an example of the different grades. I'm not going to play each video here.

Krishna Menon:

On the top left, you've got a first grader creating a book report using a green screen. Then you got to eighth graders in the top there doing a history project, which is a lot more scripted, lot more planned and produced with it. Again, the platform evolves as the student skills evolve. It's not a one time thing that you use in a grade. You use it throughout your academic career. So that was a lot about what we've done and what we've learned so far. Clearly we've seen the importance of video creation in the classroom. We spent the last couple of years thinking about, where do we see this going? Our focus has a lot been on collaboration and things like that. We talked to a lot of teachers like you, and ambassadors and things like that to figure out, what is it that we need to do to take the platform forward?

Krishna Menon:

I'll talk a little bit about that and first, we focus a lot on students and students adopting it. But it's important that we get teachers also to adopt it because teachers have busy days. They're not going to have time to adapt these technologies. So what we've done is, what if we made it easier to integrate classroom workflows? Whether these workflows have to do with assignments or creating lesson plans. What if we made it easier for them to use that within WeVideo? Those are some of the things we're thinking about. Then if you look and say, it's not just about the technology. It's so much about collaboration. It's, how do the students work with other students? How do the students work with teachers and so on? Collaboration is again, how do we take it to the next level?

Krishna Menon:

When you specifically go into collaboration, you have two teachers who want to work with each other in lesson planning or co facilitating. So we need to be able to support, make it as flexible as possible for teachers to work with it and also for students to work with us. It's not just students collaborating locally in their classroom or with another classroom. They're collaborating with students in other countries, so more global classrooms. We want to make these collaboration models very flexible, to allow anybody to collaborate with each other. So after spending a lot of time with teachers, ambassadors, students, we're finally ready to launch the new WeVideo. First, this is just the initial version. It doesn't replace what we have, it adds onto what we have. It's going to be available in September, but it's a controlled release. It's going to be for a select few and we'll give you information how you sign up for it.

Krishna Menon:

But the idea here is that we're developing something that's going to take collaboration creativity to the next level. You guys are the first one to see this. So I'm going to start off by showing you a video and then I'll describe a little bit more about what it is. (silence).

Krishna Menon:

Thank you. So what we've done is we've taken what we have today, which has done very well for us, and focused a lot more on classroom workflows, how we bring that in, more collaboration models. So we can look a little more into it, things like lesson plans. You've got a teacher who comes in ... I talked a lot about teacher adoption. How do we make it easier? All you have to say is, I'm a fifth grade history teacher and we'll give you ideas on how to use it in the classroom. Then once you have that, you can create assignments, create teams, create assignments. Again, it's very step by step process there. Once it's assigned to the students, the students can work on it. As they're working on it, the teachers can observe what they're doing, how far they're in their creation process. Then when you're done with it, you submit the assignments. So the teacher keeps track of who's submitted it and then they can review and provide feedback. So there's another way of collaboration where within the system, you can not only create assignments, but you can also grade and provide feedback on the assignments.

Krishna Menon:

That's all part of the process going forward. Right now, this is what we've got in the first version. Over the next 12 months, we're going to involve this more into additional collaboration tools, more creativity tools. Come early next year, most of that'll be complete on our brand new of WeVideo with a lot more functionality. Any questions?

audience:

[inaudible 00:43:12].

Krishna Menon:

Yes.

audience:

[inaudible 00:43:15].

Krishna Menon:

You can set it up in a way that the students can also see it, or just the teachers and students see it. Again, we want to make the collaboration model as flexible as possible.

audience:

I want students to learn.

Krishna Menon:

Yes, that's exactly right. Yes. That's a great way of learning.

audience:

In this new version, can two students edit at the same time?

Krishna Menon:

We're looking into ways of doing it. Exactly how we want to do it is not quite clear because if you do it like Google Docs, it might be a little bit complicated. This is where there's a challenge where maybe we show them what they're doing, but not be able to edit it. So you can see what somebody else is doing, because it's updating in real time, but maybe you don't let them edit at the same time. We'll be around after the meeting, so please stop by, ask some questions. If you want to sign up for it, let us know. You can sign up for the beta release of this. Thank you very much.

Katy Eddleman:

My name is Katy [Eddleman 00:44:15] and I teach sixth grade language arts and social studies at Dartmouth Middle School in San Jose, California. I love using WeVideo with Chromebooks because my students each have their own Chromebook. We're a one to one district, so they always have their Chromebooks with them. So it's super easy to use, because every child has access. So right now my students are working on podcasts. They're recording their voices, recording music to go with it and sound effects. Really having a really, really great time.

Randy Martino:

Hi. My name is Randy [Martino 00:44:46]. I am the principal of Dartmouth Middle School in San Jose, California and I've been in education for 26 years. The process started by a few teachers who are really innovators. They have been utilizing it for their units on storytelling. Really caught on with our other teachers and other content levels, and much more simplified than what products the other teachers have been using. The WeVideo product ties into our 21st Century initiative by making students autonomous with their learning, being able to project their thinking, their critical thinking, being able to access information. The ability for teachers to correct and analyze information online transforms feedback and transforms learning.

Speaker 12:

I like using WeVideo on my Chromebook because there are lots of different ways that you can split audio and images. It's really simple to do. WeVideo has helped me learn my lessons in a more fun way. I feel like that's a lot more productive.

Katy Eddleman:

Some teachers might be reluctant to try using technology in the classroom. They don't need to know everything. Their students will teach them and that's what's been really great for me, is I've learned through my students. We've gone on this journey together where we'll try this and make it better, and help each other and collaborate by creating these videos in the classroom. I would say just go for it.

Scott Devore:

This next gentleman is an author and education connector, and more importantly he's WeVideo's chief education officer. Dr. Nathan, come on up buddy.

Dr. Nathan Lang-Raad:

I understand that I am between you and wine right now, so I will make this snappy. As you know that most of my teammates actually live in the Bay Area. So one day my husband and I were talking. We were like, we want to move to a thriving metropolis too; high energy and a vibrant night life. So what we decided to do was to actually move to that place. We picked up and moved to right in the middle of the state of Maine. So we live there now, a beautiful place. When I was watching Dee's presentation, he was showing off his Google Home. I was thinking about, well we have some pretty amazing technology in our home in Maine as well. How many of you have seen the Ring app before? It's the doorbell app that captures video. You've seen the viral videos that people will steal Amazon packages off of your front porch and you talk to them to scare them. I'm watching and that's my package.

Dr. Nathan Lang-Raad:

So we decided, we lived out in the middle of nowhere, so we should probably make sure we are secure. So we purchased the Ring cameras. So we had this aerial view. What happens is that you get a notification, not like that though. You get a notification that someone is at your front door. So one night 2AM, we get a notification someone is at our front door. You're thinking, oh what's going on here? So we opened up our phone and this is what we saw. So it was not anybody stealing our Amazon package, it was a black bear. This is our front door and he's like, I'm checking it out. I'm going to see what's happening here. He's like, nothing interesting here, but I smell something. What's over here? I don't know if you can see it, but there's a little something, something up on the top there, a little bird feeder there. So I don't know if he's doing pull ups. I have no clue if he's going to be able to do this at the time. I see a paw. Oh, I see two paws. Come on, go. You got this. Get up there. Get up there. He made it. Oh yeah, reward.

Dr. Nathan Lang-Raad:

So we were seeing if we post this on social media, and everyone was sending us messages like, "Stupid. You know you live in Maine. You have a bird feeder. You're supposed to hide it." I was like, I don't know if it was the bird feeder because I walked out in the front door and I looked down, and I realized that this was our welcome mat. So there we go. Obviously we bought the technology and instead we're getting the Discovery Channel. We've seen every animal known to the state of Maine. It does remind me in the connection here for education and technology. I think about as teachers and we get this technology thrown at us, and many times technology was not made for education. Many times the district says, "Here's your technology. Make it work for your classroom." Many times these educators, we're expected to pull rabbits out of hats. We're expected to take this technology and make magic out of it, and make these beautiful learning experiences as Dee was talking about.

Dr. Nathan Lang-Raad:

Sometimes this is very, very difficult. I think it's difficult because our classrooms may not look like this today, but a lot of our school structures still emulate this system. So it's very, very hard to do technology integration well when you have an antiquated system of procedures, and systems and structures. So you hear people say, "Creativity is great and critical thinking, communication. But don't we still need to be teaching students reading and writing arithmetic?" You know where this statement comes from in the antiquated classroom. Yes, those are foundational skills that must be taught in a classroom. I think back at some of the famous mathematicians and scientists. Many people think that because they had so much knowledge stored or they were naturally clinical and smart, that they discover maybe gravity or some concept. If you read Isaac Newton's story, we have no clue if it was an apple that hit him on his head or not. That's still debatable. It could've been a glass of wine for all we know.

Dr. Nathan Lang-Raad:

But something hit him on his head and he was thinking about things. There are all these theories floating around about the moon, how it orbits the Earth. So it wasn't the fact that he had all these equations memorized in his head that led him to discover gravity. It was creativity. So you hear a lot about creativity in the classroom and the question is, why aren't we seeing more of it happening? Why is it not scalable? I say this a lot because I think it's so true. When you look at creativity, you think it's autonomous. It's free floating. You let kids have a voice and you let kids have choice. I like to say creativity is 1% process and 99% mindset, but it's that 1% that gets away of the 99%. Many times as teachers, we aren't given structures to let students unleash that creativity. They just say, "Hey, your kids should be creative. Make it work. Let them be creative."

Dr. Nathan Lang-Raad:

Which is why I love the WeVideo tool because we have developed a structure to help students be more creative in the classroom. It led me to write this book, WeVideo Everyday, because I wanted to help educators think about some ideas about how they could use WeVideo in the classroom every day. Not just a historical documentation, which is great. Not just an end of unit project, but actually quick, easy strategies. And a little surprise, we have for you ... I should've practiced this. I'm afraid books will fly everywhere. That was planned. That was totally planned. Thanks Patrick. All right. So everyone here does get a free copy of ... I would love to connect with you. If you don't catch me today, I will also be at the Ed Tech team booth tomorrow from 12 to 1 to chat and sign books. Enjoy the rest of your evening and thank you all for coming today.

Dr. Nathan Lang-Raad:

Thanks for joining me on the Deeper Learning With WeVideo Podcast. If you like this topic, recommend us to your friends, give us a five star review and check out our other episodes on this platform. Be sure to get a copy of my latest book WeVideo Everyday, 40 Strategies to Deepen Learning in Any Class, available now on Amazon through Ed Tech Team Press. You can interact with me on Twitter and Instagram at Dr. Lang-Raad, spelled D-R-L-A-N-G-R-A-A-D. You can also check out more media content on YouTube at YouTube.com/wevideo. WeVideo empowers all students to express their ideas authentically and creatively. Visit the website at wevideo.com/education. See you next time. Bye.

 

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